What is Antisocial Personality Disorder?

What is Antisocial Personality Disorder?

This video describes Antisocial Personality Disorder. Antisocial Personality Disorder is characterized by repeated acts that violate the norms of society, deceitfulness, impulsivity, irritability, verbal and physical aggression, reckless disregard for the safety of others, irresponsibility, lack of remorse, and lack of empathy. The characteristics typically associated with Antisocial Personality Disorder in prison settings are superficial charm, lack of empathy, inflated self-appraisal. The etiology of Antisocial Personality Disorder is genetic and environmental. Trauma appears to contributed to the development of Antisocial Personality Disorder. The prevalence of Antisocial Personality Disorder is about 3% of males and 1% of females. About 70% – 80% of males in prison may have Antisocial Personality Disorder. Sociopathy and psychopathy are sets of characteristics that represent distinct patterns of behavior and etiology, but are still under the Antisocial Personality Disorder classification. Generally, a person suffering from sociopathy is thought to have developed the disorder as a result of a stressor, such as trauma. Genetics are thought to be responsible for psychopathy. Both are associated with criminal activity, however, sociopathy is associated with impulsive criminal acts whereas psychopathy is associated with planned crimes. Meaningful relationships are difficult to form with psychopathy, but slightly easier to form with sociopathy. Sociopathy is associated with mood dysphoria and dysregulation, whereas psychopathy is associated with remaining more emotionally stable. Psychopathy is associated with being cold and calculating, and considering the consequences of behavior more carefully than in sociopathy.