Missing Argentine sub located with oxygen due to run out THIS MORNING

Missing Argentine sub located with oxygen due to run out THIS MORNING

AN ARGENTINE submarine missing in the South Atlantic “has been found after a heat signal was detected” – with oxygen due to run out this morning.The ARA San Juan would have enough oxygen for its crew to survive underwater for seven days, if there was no hull breach, according to officials.That time was set to run out this morning, after the sub vanished on Wednesday last week.But reports have now surfaced that rescue crews searching for the missing sub have detected a heat signal beneath the waves.A new search perimeter was set up after the signal was picked up, according to two sources cited by Argentinian website Clarin.A plane and a ship have both now reportedly detected a signal around 185 miles off the coast of Puerto Madryn, 230ft below the sea.The story has not yet been confirmed by any official sources, and the newspaper reports that it is still not clear if the signal is the submarine.But boats are said to be converging on the area the signal came from to see if it really is the San Juan.The news has prompted a nail-biting wait for the friends and relatives of those on board the vessel, many of which have gathered by a naval base in Mar del Plata.The San Juan made its last contact with authorities to report a mechanical breakdown.The 34-year-old German-built diesel-electric submarine – which was refitted between 2007 and 2014 – had flagged a breakdown in its batteries.It said it was diverting its route from the far south of Argentina’s Atlantic waters to the navy base at Mar del Plata, where most of the crew members live.But it didn’t issue a distress call and it was unclear if the problem left the vessel without propulsion or unable to surface.The search began November 16, when there was no more contact.The sub’s disappearance has gripped the nation, and President Mauricio Macri visited the relatives – troubled by earlier false hopes – and prayed with them.Underwater sounds first thought to be the crew banging on the hull were later determined to be something else.A crack Royal Navy team is among those searching for the stricken sub, joining thousands of troops from the US, France, Germany, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Colombia and Uruguay.But some Argie politicians have reacted with fury at the UK’s involvement, branding Brits “pirates” and “occupiers”, in reference to the Falkland Islands.We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at tips@the-sun.